Monthly Archives: April 2015

Simulation Programs Should Stop Selling Simulation

SimforSaleWhatever do I mean? Many established simulation programs believe that their value is through creating simulation programs for people by which to attain knowledge, skills and/or perfect aspects of that needed to effectively care for patients. All of that is true, obviously. However, I believe that the true value of many established simulation programs is in the deep educational infrastructure that they provide to the institution with whom they may be affiliated. Whether that expertise is in the project management of educational design, educational design itself, the housing of the cadre of people who are truly interested in education, or the operational scheduling and support needed to pull off a major program, I believe these examples are the true understated value of many simulation programs.

Simulation programs tend to attract a variety of people who are truly interested in education. While I don’t think that everyone who is passionate about teaching in healthcare needs to be an educational expert, I do believe that it is important that we have people involved in the development and deployment of innovative education who are truly interested in teaching. Many hospitals and universities rely on personnel to conduct their education programs that are subject matter experts, but may or may not have desire, interest or satisfactory capabilities needed for teaching.

Many people who are passionate about teaching in healthcare have a particular topic or two that they like to teach about, but lack the skills of critical analysis, and deeper knowledge of educational design principles to help them parse their education efforts into the appropriate methods to create maximal efficiency in the uptake of the subject matter.  This very factor is likely why we still rely on good old-fashioned lecture as a cornerstone of healthcare education whether we are evaluating that from the school perspective, or the practicing healthcare arena. Not that I believe there is anything wrong with lecture, I just believe that it is often overused, often done poorly, and often done in a way that does not encourage active engagement or active learning between the lecturer in the participant’s.

Simulation programs are often the water cooler in many institutions around which people that are truly interested in and may have some additional expertise in an education will tend to congregate. The power of this proximity creates an environment rich for brainstorming, enthusiasm for pushing the envelope of capabilities, and continuous challenge to improve the methods by which we undertake healthcare education.

Simulation programs that have curricular development capabilities often have project management expertise as well as operational expertise to create complex educational solutions. This combination of skills can be exceptionally valuable to the development of any innovative education program in healthcare whether or not simulation is part of the equation.

Many times healthcare education endeavors are undertaken by one or two people who quickly become overwhelmed without the supporting infrastructure that it takes to put on educational activities of a higher complexity than a simple lecture. Often times this supporting technology or set of resources resides inside the walls of “simulation centers” are programs. By not providing access to these para-simulation resources to the rest of the institution, I argue that simulation programs are selling themselves short.

If you consider the educational outcomes from a leadership perspective (i.e. CEO, Dean etc.), They are much less concerned about how the educational endeavor occurred, but far more focused on the outcomes. So while there are many topics and situations that are perfect for simulation proper, we all know there is a larger need for educational designs with complexity larger than that of a lecture that may not involve simulation.

If a given simulation program partners with those trying to create complex educational offerings that don’t directly involve simulation, but are good for the mission of the overall institution with whom they are aligned, it is likely going to endear, or create awareness for the need for continuing or expanding the support of that particular program by the senior leadership team.

If you sit back and think about it, isn’t that an example of great teamwork?

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